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10 Reasons Why Ski Holidays in Alta Badia Rock

Alta Badia. There’s snow business quite like it. Between the mouth-watering cuisine, stunning sun terraces with stellar panoramic views, and a plethora of winter adventure activities to do, we didn’t want to tear ourselves away. We’ll definitely be back to Alta Badia next season. But just in case you’re still not convinced, we’ve got 10 reasons why ski holidays in Alta Badia rock.

Reflections of the Dolomites in Alta Badia1. 130 kilometers of slopes

Alta Badia is assured of good snow conditions because of its high altitude and blanket snow-making coverage of all the essential pistes. Part of the world’s largest ski network, Alta Badia offers 130 kilometers of slopes served by 53 ski lifts. With well groomed runs and an easy-to-use lift system, Alta Badia was one of Tim’s favorite places to ski this year. No doubt more ski holidays in Alta Badia will be on our winter travel schedule.

Alta Badia Slope Food

Croissants filled with (from left) Graukäse cheese topped with herbed red onion, smoked trout with apple and horseradish, and cheese topped with speck

2. Slope Food

You’ve heard of street food, but Alta Badia takes it a step further with Slope Food. Scrumptious street food on the slopes made by 14 Michelin-starred chefs at 14 mountain huts all with unique Tyrolean flavors designed to satisfy the appetite of the hungriest of skiers (or snowshoers like me). Each Slope Food is €12 per tasting and comes with a carefully selected wine pairing included. You can also go on a Gourmet Ski Safari with your Slope Food Card, which allows you to taste Slope Food at 3 huts for €30 per person.

Wine Ski Safari

Wine tasting on top of a mountain? Yes, please!

3. You can go on a Wine Ski Safari

If Slope Food isn’t reason enough to ski hut-to-hut, perhaps Alta Badia’s annual Wine Ski Safari is! Six mountain huts offer 30 different varieties of Alto Adige wines at each hut, all above 2000 meters. Each hut has its own spectacular views of the UNESCO World Heritage Dolomites mountains and its own vibe with live music. Kick off your skis and grab a glass and a sun lounger. I guarantee you’ve never gone wine tasting like this before!

Val Scura

The arrow marks the Val Scura. Would you dare?

4. Extreme skiing for those who like a challenge

This is skiing for the insane. Val Scura, or the Dark Valley, is where expert skiers can test their skills by climbing up the backside of the mountain and skiing down the 4.3 kilometer run with a vertical descent of 997 meters. The dizzying channel is so narrow, I imagine one wrong swoosh would send a skier bouncing down the mountain like a ball in a ping-pong machine. But the truly bad-ass skiers take on the Val Scura at least once each year.

Alta Badia Snowpark

Alta Badia Snowpark

5. Get your jump on at the Alta Badia Snowpark

Aerials and moguls, jumps and bumps. Alta Badia Snowpark between the slopes “La Frëina” and “Ciampai” has got them. There’s two sections: the upper section is for more experienced boarders and the lower section is for newbies looking for a little action. And the Alta Badia Snowpark is free to use!

6. It’s part of the Sella Ronda circuit

The Sella Ronda is the most well-known ski route in the Dolomites. It’s a loop that either runs clockwise or counter clockwise around the massif of Sella mountain. It’s 26 kilometers of trails can be accomplished in one day and is something to proudly check off your ski bucket list.

Alta Badia7. There’s something to do even for the non-skiers

You don’t have to don skis to enjoy Alta Badia. If like me, you actually can’t ski (though next season I’m committing to taking snowboard lessons so I can hit the slopes with Tim), there is still plenty to do. There are more than 80 kilometers of signposted paths ideal for Nordic walking and snowshoeing. Every week there are guided snowshoe hikes and this is the perfect way to do some wildlife viewing of the rabbits, fox, and roe deer that call Alta Badia home.

There are also toboggan trails. Check out the 3.5 kilometer long toboggan run from Piz Sorega.

Marmolada

Marmolada looms in the distance

8. Spectacular 360° views

Declared a Natural Heritage Site by UNESCO in 2009, there is no where more pristine and captivating for a ski holiday than Alta Badia. Each ski trail and mountain hut offers it own unique 360° panoramas of the mountains and valleys. That is if you can tear your eyes away from the majestic Marmolada, the highest mountain of the Dolomites towering at 10,968 feet (3343 meters).

Utia Las Vegas

Las Vegas après-ski party

9. Après-ski

Ain’t no party like an après-ski party and Utia Las Vegas at the Piz Sorega lives up to it’s name. With a live band playing the best of the ’70s and ’80s, it’s time to trade in your skis and poles for dancing on the table tops.

Maso Runch

A home cooked Ladin meal at Maso Runch

10. Gastronomic delights

I already mentioned the Michelin-starred Slope Food, but Alta Badia’s mountain huts offered up other mouth-watering Tyrolean cuisine. Ever had lobster at 2000 meters? I have (and it was delicious, by the way!). Alta Badia is also known for its Ladin cuisine – ancient recipes handed down through the families. Once considered a poor man’s cuisine because it was made from simple ingredients that could be produced on the farm, it’s now something very special visitors to Alta Badia should try. Arrange a visit to one of the Ladin farmhouses through the tourist office. We promise you won’t be disappointed!

Know Before You Go

  • Alta Badia is easy to reach via Bolzano, Verona, Treviso, Venice, or Innsbruck airports and the South Tyrol train stations Brunico, Bressanone and Bolzano are connected to Alta Badia by a regular local bus service.
  • We recommend staying at Hotel Antines in La Villa. Standard rooms range from €135 – €166 per person per night depending on the season. The hotel offers parking and you can reach the ski lifts on foot from the hotel.
  • Alta Badia ski passes are €41 per day per adult and include 130 kilometers of slopes serviced by 53 lifts in the Corvara, Colfosco, San Cassiano, La Villa and Badia and at the Campolongo, Gardena and Falzarego passes.

UNESCO_Logo-150x150

 

This is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. For more info click here.
You can see all the UNESCO World Heritage Sites we’ve visited here.

 

Disclosure: Our trip to Alta Badia and our Wine Ski Safari were hosted by Alta Badia Tourism in order to bring you this story. As always, all opinions are entirely our own and were in no way influenced by copious amounts of Michelin-starred food, glasses of quality Alto Adige wine, or the best snow in all of Europe for skiing.

Jennifer Dombrowski

Jennifer Dombrowski is a location independent globe trotter who is based in Prata di Pordenone, Italy. She works as a social media and communications strategist and is an award-winning travel writer. She is also a travel correspondent on Traveling on the American Forces Radio Network. Jdomb's Travels was named one of the top travel blogs to watch by the Huffington Post and has been featured by top publications such as CNN, Buzzfeed , and The Telegraph. Her iPhoneograpy has also been featured on publications such as USA Today and Travel + Leisure. Google+

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10 comments

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  1. Angela Travels

    I love hearing about other ski destinations around the world. Since I am new to skiing, I have lots to learn. Looks like great terrain and variety! Sign me up for the wine ski safari!

    [Reply]

    Jennifer Dombrowski Reply:

    Angela, Tim says that Alta Badia is a perfect ski destination to learn too. I definitely want to take some snowboarding lessons next season. I can’t ski because the ski boots aggravate a foot injury I have, so I think snowboarding is the solution.

    [Reply]

  2. Leah

    Well, consider this place added to the list of European places I need to ski. Love the wine tasting!

    [Reply]

    Jennifer Dombrowski Reply:

    You would love Alta Badia Leah! Bonus, Alta Badia is only about 2.5 hours from my house.

    [Reply]

  3. Christy

    Omg.. those Croissants look amazing! I could definitely get on board with this.

    [Reply]

    Jennifer Reply:

    They were SO good, Christy! My favorite was the cheese topped with speck on the far right. The chef is a two Michelin-starred chef and he has a restaurant in Alta Badia. I’m dying to go back and dine at his restaurant.

    [Reply]

  4. Ming

    I don’t snowboard or ski and I’m not even a big fan of snow but you got me with the croissants with fillings! And definitely worth a visit to check off another UNESCO site. We follow each other on Twitter and I’m glad I finally had a chance to stop by. Great posts!

    [Reply]

    Jennifer Dombrowski Reply:

    Thanks for stopping by Ming! Those croissants were seriously amazing. I probably shouldn’t tell you that a delicious lobster spaghetti followed. Yummy! And it was so warm, I was snowshoeing in short sleeves.

    [Reply]

  5. Ben Leigh

    Mind Blowing of Alta Badia rock ski holidays.. I am a supporter of ski, but now it change me to up in arms to go for ski every day of my weekend. . Chance will take along to Alta Badia rock . !! :)

    [Reply]

  6. Alex

    wao!! its looking like a dreams. Great work you have done i wish to come here.I had a visit last year at Ski Magic and they provide all the comforts to our family and including us.

    [Reply]

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